Custom Fit by Glad Wrap

7 Jul

Disclaimer: This Is Not A Glad Wrap Ad

I had a very productive day today. Did some laundry, some ironing, some tidying…and some gladwrapping. What did I gladwrap? Me. You see, in the sewing world, it is very useful to have dressforms to pin things on because you want to test the fit and hang of a garment. However, dressforms are very expensive, and sewing test garments all the time is rather time-consuming. The answer? Gladwrap yourself. The idea is to wrap yourself up in glad wrap with a few layers, mark the seam lines and darts and centre lines, cut off the wrap, lay it flat , and then use that as YOUR pattern for making garments to your measurements. So much faster. So that was what I’ve been up to today. I made a friend online who does patternmaking at TAFE, and we made a date to gladwrap ourselves today. So Mandy came over and we set to work. I came across this idea here.

Here’s a walkthrough: You need Gladwrap or any sort of clingwrap, a tight t-shirt, a permanent marker pen, scissors, brown tape, string and a patient friend.

Tape the waistline

I tied some string around my natural waist and used packing tape on it.

Mark the centre front line with tape

Sorry for the fuzzy picture. The centre front needs to be marked with tape. Same with the back.

Back centre line

Start wrapping around the whole body down to the hip and over the neck and shoulders till you get this.

Gladwrapped

Mark the bust points, the centre front and back lines…

Centre back line

Ignore the diamond shape lines on the back-they are supposed to be straight lines from the shoulder blades down to about 5 inches below the hipline.

Mark the shoulder seams, the neckline, the side seams and the armhole. Tape all of the above.

Mark the darts from the bustpoints straight down to about 5 inches below the hipline.

Like this

I’m feeling like I’m in a funky disco costume. But I can’t dance coz it’s too tight.

Here’s another view

Now we’re ready to get out of this …thing…

Cut cut cut

Cut down the centre front line-or the back centre line. Doesn’t really matter.

And voila!

Mini Me!

That’s an exact replica of my body shape which I will cut up into flat pieces to make body fitting dress patterns.

Here is the thing sawn in half

To make the patterns, the body wrap form must be cut into flat pieces. Cut along the waistline, the neck line, the shoulder and the side seams and you will get this.

Upper bodice and lower bodice pieces

Now I will proceed to slash the darts-this makes the pieces flat. If there is still some 3-D shape to the wrap, you will need to add more darts, or deepen the dart slash to flattern it. We found that because there was so  many layers of wrap, it was a little hard to ascertain that the pattern lay completely flat.

Slashed darts

The darts that were drawn in as straightlines at the back and the front has to be slashed open till the pattern lies flat like the above picture. Then lay in on a wide piece of paper and trace around. This is what you’ll get.

Personal block

Bear in mind that you can’t make a dress with the pattern here-it has no seam allowance, no ease. You can’t really move or breathe in this, unless it was a stretch material.

We actually made two wraps, and the one shown here is the first one. The first one had more layers on it, and therefore more stable and didn’t warp afterwards. The second one we didn’t use as many layers, so it’s starting to come apart-the gladwrap wasn’t as sticky as we’d thought it’d be. So if anyone attempts it, wrap at least 10 layers evenly all over the body.

I’m actually a little puzzled as to how the skirt block turned out. The front dart hardly opens, and the back dart looks odd. Also, I didn’t expect the armhole to look so….angular. Hmm. Well I’ll need to grade it up one size and make up a test garment to see how it’ll look. Stay tuned!

Edited on 1/12/2014: I’ve published maternity and nursing patterns on Craftsy! Be sure to check them out!

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4 Responses to “Custom Fit by Glad Wrap”

  1. Alison Han July 9, 2010 at 2:52 pm #

    the gladwrap ideal are just a brilliant ideal for home tailors for cost saving!!
    but, it must have a partner to work this out?

    • Wyld Woman July 10, 2010 at 12:23 am #

      Isn’t it just great?! Yes, you’ll have to have a partner to do it. Also, you’ll need to add 1 inch at least to the bust line, the waist, and at leat 2 inches to the hip for you to sit down.

  2. M-C May 7, 2012 at 7:31 pm #

    I’d like to point out that, sadly, not all wraps are created equal. You’ll have much better results with the original Saran Wrap, which has more body and isn’t so hard to manipulate in terms to bunching up and sticking to itself. It’d avoid some of what you experienced, needing so many disorganized layers that you lose track of when the resulting pattern is flat.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. White Nursing Cocktail Dress « All The Wyld Things - August 18, 2010

    […] bit of stretch, but I wanted a form fitting dress, I decided it would be a good time to take my Gladwrap pattern and use that to make the pattern of this dress. Gladwrap […]

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