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White Nursing Cocktail Dress

17 Aug

Some time ago I went to Munno Para Spotlight with a friend and picked up a lovely fabric for 6 dollars a metre. It was a polyester spandex fabric with an off white background with sketchy black roses. I fell in love with the fabric and decided to make a dress with it for a wedding that I was to attend-which was last weekend. I wanted to make a cocktail dress, but had to think long and hard about what design would suit the fabric, keeping in mind that I also wanted to be able to breastfeed in it.  I decided to make a dress of this design.

Nursing Cocktail dress

The dress was to have an empire waist, princess seams, a crossover front with gathers, within which there was to be a hidden opening for nursing access.

Because this was a woven material with a tiny bit of stretch, but I wanted a form fitting dress, I decided it would be a good time to take my Gladwrap pattern and use that to make the pattern of this dress.

Gladwrap pattern

I traced around onto a new sheet of paper and cleaned up the lines. I made two test garments before I was satisfied with it. This was the finished pattern.

Gladwrap sloper

I discovered that I have a swayback, and forward shoulder. A swayback is when a person’s back curves inward more than usual, requiring a deeper dart in the back waist.

I wanted a dress that was fully lined, with a combined arm and neck facing. Here are my pattern pieces and fabric all cut out.

Pattern and fabric pieces

Above you can see the facing pieces has already been interfaced-I block fused the interfacing to the fabric before cutting it out. I used a fusible warp-knit interfacing which was really light, had some stretch, and was almost plush on the non-fusible side. It was perfect for this fabric-I also tried it on a twill and a crepe and it still draped beautifully without changing the hand of the fabric.

Warp-knt interfacing

I also interfaced the front bust crossover pieces, as it needed some structure and stabilizing for the nursing access. I marked the bust point on the piece and slashed it to 3 cm above and then overlocked the slash-like this.

Nursing access

I was also careful to mark all the important points with either notches or tailors tacks. The blue thread you see above marked the triple folds on the bust piece. The folds were done in such a way that it hid the nursing access in a pleat-see below.

Front shoulder and bust panels joined

Here I’ve made the folds in the shoulder piece and joined it to the bust panel. These need to be joined to the back shoulder panels. Then I stitch all the princess seams in the front and back but do not join them to the top panels yet as I need to stitch in the neck facing and lining first.

Front princess seams

Bust and shoulder panels

Next I work on the facing and lining pieces, joining them all together except at the side seams.

Facing and lining pieces

Here the join at the  neckline facing and lining get a little tricky. If you look closely, I made a slit in the center top on the front lining, thinking that it would be necessary to accomodate the crossover at the bust. I found later that the slit wasn’t necessary at all.

Next I joined the neckline facing to the front bust panels.

Joining the front to the facing

I graded the seam allowance to reduce bulk, then turned and understitched the facing and seam allowances together. After this, I sewed the bust panels to the princess panels, and then all the side seams.

I marked the nursing slit length on the lining and opened it up.

Nursing access in the lining

Here I inserted an invisible zipper, sandwiching the zipper between the right sides of the lining and the shell, and handbasting first. I don’t think its the correct way to insert an invisible zipper into a garment with the lining, as the zipper can get caught in the lining. I had to redo the zipper twice before I was satisfied with it. Next time I’ll set the lining away fron the zipper.

I had left the armhole edges on both the lining and the shell raw, so I did a rolled hem on the armhole  shell with black thread. I overlocked the lining armhole, and used the overlocker to cut away 1cm all around the armhole so that the lining wouldn’t show.

I did a rolled hem with a narrow hemmer on my machine for the hem. For the lining hem, I overlocked the edges to trim away any longerbits, and then I sewed some lace for a couture touch. I love that only I know that it’s there.

Lace on the lining hem

And finally….

Here’s a back view.

It looks a bit rumpled because it just travelled to Melbourne and back again. I wore it almost the whole day at my friend’s wedding.

Here’s a view of the nursing access.

Hidden nursing access.

The dress was an amazing fit. Using the Gladwrap to make a personal sloper is a fantastic idea. No need to keep making fitting changes or multiple test garments. I highly recommend making one.

Here’s a final picture of me at Claudia and Kaiwin’s wedding.

Silvia, Manchee, Claudia, me, and Chok Fung

Edited on 1/12/2014: I’ve published maternity and nursing patterns on Craftsy! Be sure to check them out!

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Yellow Nursing Top

28 Jul

A few months ago I bought some yellow jersey material from an op shop. It was a very pretty yellow, just my colour. I make it a policy to snap up knit fabrics if I see them in opshops as knits are quite pricey compared to wovens. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do with it then, but a few days ago I thought that I should start drafting patterns for knits. And I’ve been wanting a top for nursing-ones that have discreet access for breastfeeding. I came up with this design.

Design idea

It was to have an empire waistline, a wrap front with bust gathers, and a modesty panel behind with cutouts for nursing (see dotted line and gray shaded area). At first I wanted to make puffed cap sleeves  as in the picture, but when I made my pattern, I forgot and just make short set in sleeves.

I drafted the pattern from scratch using Winifred Aldrich’s close fitting jersey bodice block.

It's the one on the far left

I chose the option with greater ease (Aldrich gives you instructions for close fitting with maximum stretch, and another with more ease for less flexible material).

My personal jersey clost fit block with sleeve

I took some pictures of the drafting and pattern manipulating processes- but stopped halfway because the pictures weren’t that good. Here are some of them.

The back and the modesty panel for the front

This is the wrap front-I'm correcting the gape by slashing the neckline and pivoting it

That’s all I have of the drafting. I WILL take more organised pictures in the future…

Anyways,  that was a few days ago and I didn’t get to put the whole thing together till today. This is how it looks like.

Front view

Back view

That’s an awful lot of wrinkles. Methinks I have to do a narrow back adjustment, a swayback adjustment, and a forward shoulder adjustment. Or maybe it’s the way I’m standing.

Closeup

Below you’ll see how it functions as a nursing top.

Discreet nursing access

Instead of pulling the top up for feeding, this top provides full coverage.

I’m really happy with the way this top turned out-it looks completely store bought. It’s not my first time sewing a knit top, but it was the most successful. This was because I used  tricot knit interfacing strips to stabilise the necklines and armholes to keep them from stretching out of shape.

If anybody is interested, I can draft a custom nursing top pattern based on this or make you one. Just email me.

Quick Pencil Skirt

16 Jul

On Monday I bought a 2-metre piece of twill fabric at the opshop for 2 dollars. I knew that it was perfect winter skirt material. I planned to make a Vogue inspired skirt out of it, and after cutting it out, I found that I still had enough left for another skirt. This post will be about that skirt which I knocked up on the fly yesterday.

I wanted a quick pencil skirt with a slit-no zippers or closures-something with a stretch waistband that I can wear whether pregnant or not. I had some black stretch fabric lying around that I had bought from some opshop in some distant past, and some grey lining material that I was given. I quickly measured my waist and my hips-33″ and 38″. It is depressing to realise  that I’ll never be a 24″ again.

My plan was to just measure and cut on the cloth without any pattern. I wanted a rectangle of black stretch fabric about 3/4 of my waist measurement for the waistband, about 6 inches high and doubled over for strength and stability as per diagram below.

The blueprint

The waistband would go from my natural waist to my hipline, and the twill fabric panels will start from the hip. That way I needn’t add darts for the lower panels, since it would fit over the widest part of my hips without any closures. The lower panels are cut simply-my hips were 36+2 inches wearing ease=38″, so the front panel was 19″ wide with half inch seam allowances, and the back panels 9.5″ with seam allowances. The front and back panels taper downwards to 17inches and 8.5 inches in width respectively. The back panels I added about 1.5 inches in width starting from the middle centre back line for a split.

The cut pieces

I also cut a lining from the above twill fabric pieces.

Cutting into the lining

See Ma! No pins! I was really doing this on the fly. I was more excited about this skirt than the Vogue inspired one now-even though that one is all cut out.

First thing was to overlock all the edges.Most sewing machines have an overcasting stitch if you don’t have an overlocker, although if you do plan on sewing garments, you can’t beat an overlocker for a professional finish. I love mine.

To make the waistband, join the shortest edges of the two pieces together and form a tube. Use a narrow zigzag stitch, or overlock.

Form a tube with the stretch fabric

Fold the tube in half lengthwise, so that you have a double layer going all around your waist.

Waistband doubled up

The back slit needs to be done first. I neglected to take pictures-but here’s a walkthrough. Sew down the back seam as usual, but at the start of the outside corner, change the stitches to the largest straight stitch. Press open, and sew around the slit. Use a seam ripper and unpick the large stitchs up to the outside corner where the slit starts.

Now it’s just the simple matter of joining the two side seams together.

Repeat the whole process with the lining.

Attach the skirt to the waistband-pin at quarterly intervals, and stretch the waistband to fit the skirt as you sew. Use a narrow zigzag stitch. Now attach the lining with the same process, just be sure that the right side of the lining faces the inside. Use a blindhem stitch to hem the skirt and the lining, making sure that the lining is hemmed higher so that you don’t see the lining from the outside. Handsew the lining slit to the skirt slit.

Quick pencil skirt

Back view

Hmm..I didn’t do a very good job on the pressing. But I guess it’s not wool, since it didn’t shrink when I steamed it, and it’s not wrinkle resistant.

Closeup view

All in all, I’m very pleased with this skirt. It was a very quick job, and I spent only a dollar on the material. It will always fit me, and the pencil skirt is very flattering. It is also great for maternity wear too!

Go home and make one today!

Opshop Finds On My Birthday

13 Jul

Yesterday I turned 26. It doesn’t feel like another year has passed and that I’m a year older and only four more years away from the big three-O. In my head I still feel like a giddy 18-year-old. We had a quiet celebration with the family on Sunday night. The Wednesday before, Wyld Man and I had a special night out to celebrate both our birthdays-we’re both July babies. I got a Mileni bag as a present from the family, as well as a gift card at Suzannegrae.

Mileni bag

It’s a huge bag-I carried it around yesterday with one of the compartments with my stuff, and the other half with William’s stuff-nappy, squirt bottle, a bottle of water, nappy change mat, bib, hanky and a stuffed toy!

Anyways, yesterday morning I caught up with a playgroup mummy and she brought me to her favourite opshop! It’s run by the Uniting Church and is quite small, but I still managed to bag quite a haul. I got a few things for myself…

Opshop outfit

The tan crossover top was AUD1.75,  and the angora wool skirt was AUD3.  I especially love the skirt, with is a thick stretchy knit, quite warm and perfect for winter outfits. The only thing is that with tights, it tends to ride up unless I make a lining for it, which I shall.

I also got myself a couple of belts for 50cents each-I keep wearing mine out.

I got William a few things-lots of bibs and some little outfits like…

Marks and Spencer red striped 2 set

…for AUD3. And a couple of Wondersuits…

Wondersuits

…for a dollar each.

I also picked up 2 metres of a lovely winter weight wool twill.

Twill fabric

I’m in the middle of cutting it out for a skirt. I’ve decided to make another Vogue 8426-inspired skirt.

When I came home later that day, I had this given to me.

My Little Wyld Man's card for me

He’d even signed it!

Signed by William

Isn’t it the cutest little scribble ever?

And this was his and daddy’s present to me.

365 Day Cookbook

A friend on Facebook reminded me of how blessed I was to have my very own knight and prince.*Sigh*. Happy.

Vogue Skirt-Check.

24 Jun

Vogue 8246

I’ve spent the last 3 days making that Vogue 8426 -inspired skirt I blogged about on the previous post and took pictures today. From the start to finish, I told myself that it was going to be a mock-up/test garment/muslin instead of the real thing in order to test the fit of my drafting, and then to later make other versions of it if it was successful. However, I also wanted to make it a wearable muslin. I was quite determined to use fabric from my stash, and only to buy little incidentals like zippers if absolutely necessary. The path to the  end was frought with mishaps, with me miscutting the front centre piece NOT on the fold, and having to piece another bit of fabric to make up for it, then I discovered a hole in the skirt fabric, then after that, I couldnt’ insert the lapped zipper properly. Also, this was my first time inserting corded piping, so the results aren’t as uniform as it should be.

After reading about SewVeryPrairies’ skirt here, I thought and thought about how to draft the skirt. The front of the skirt was quite easy to draft. It was the back which had me puzzled for a bit. The bum-hugging shaping of the back of skirt has to be built into the 3 seams at the back, which ends in inverted pleats. This was what I came up with.

drafts and doodles...

It was quite successful-although for the skirt to hug the bum even more, I’d have to curve in the seams even more inwards. But I’m quite happy with my skirt as it is.

The materials I used were a dark grey crepe material, a silvery rayon? fabric, and bemberg lining.

Fabrics

Here are the pattern pieces laid out on fashion fabric ready to be all cut out.

Ready to cut.

I wanted my skirt to have piping details in the lower waist seams and on the side, but didn’t want to buy ready made piping-so I made my own. I started by cutting 1-inch wide bias strips with the grey fashion fabric.

Bias strips

Instead of buying cord for the piping, I used some regular knitting yarn.

Knitting yarn.

I used a zipper foot to sew the yarn into the piping.

Handmade corded piping

I was too lazy to take pictures of the process in between. But here are the photos of the finished project.

Front view

Back View

Side View

Closeup

The whole project cost me nothing-I used everything out of my stash, most of which came from opshops.

Not too bad for a mock-up. I’ll be making more soon.

My little man was very good-he just smiled at me from his little rocker as I hammer away on my sewing machine. How lucky am I?

Pencil Skirt-Vogue 8426

10 Jun

I have an itch to scratch. I want to sew. Want. Want. Want. I want need more winter skirts. Skirts in sturdy, thick tweeds and houndstooth. Pencil skirts. Skirts like these.

Gray high waisted pencil skirt

But I started having serious skirt envy when I saw this.

Vogue 8426 by Sew Very Prairie

Sew Very Prairie is a sewist/blogger who made this skirt for her boyfriend’s mum. What a sure-fire way to win over your mother-in law. Visit her blog for some sewing inspiration. She has made some amazing garments.

Back view

I didn’t think much of the pattern based on the envelope cover below. But made up in real life it looks stunning.

Vogue 8246 illustration

Here’s another view og the skirt.

Sew Very Prairie

I just loooove loove this skirt. It would go with just about anything. I love the seam details and the kick pleat in the back. So slimming. I would draft it myself though.  Vogue patterns can be very dear and upwards of USD15. And I do so enjoy the drafting process.

Sometimes I get an idea in my head that I just can’t stop thinking of. When I do get one, like when I did for my white jacket (which was a wadder), I become a bit obsessed with making it and finishing it. I’ve just realised how few skirts I have that would go with a big oversized jumper on the top. I do have quite a few skirts, but the suitable ones are denim and too casual, and the others are too light and print-y for spring. Some are too long and paired with an oversized jumper would look too frumpy-and I hate frumpy. And so does Wyld Man.

With the Little Wyld Man around though, it’s been a little bit hard to find the time to sew, and I need a longer stretch of time at the sewing machine. I need my sewing mojo. Where is it when you need it?

White Polkadot Wrap Shirt Refashion

7 May

Some time ago I bought a size 12 Marco Polo white wraparound polkadot shirt at a flea market for $5. I didn’t try it on, but I love love love polkadots and thought that size 12 should be okay on me. However, whenever I thought to wear it somewhere, it just never looked right on me. It wasn’t THAT big, but it didn’t fit very well on me. I offered it to a friend, thinking it would be a bit of a shame to cut it up-but she didn’t think it was her style. So, I thought, what the heck-I’ll just refashion it. I’ve had it for more than 6 months and never wore it nor done anything to it because, well, it was really pretty by itself. I was afraid of mucking up something.Now if I did something at last,  at least I’d wear it.

This is what it looks like before.

The Polkadot Wraparound Shirt

It makes me think of a nurse’s uniform somehow. The bow would never sit right and it felt that the sleeves were an awkward length on me.

I decided to recut the whole shirt to fit me better- at the sleeves and armholes, and at the side seams. And as in my other two refashions, to cut off the midsection and substitute with black stretch knit.

I cut off the midsection first-just folded the shirt in half and eyeballed it. I didn’t really measure anything this time. I pinned the wrap fronts together before I started cutting.

Cutting off the midsection

Next, I unpicked the side seams and the armhole seams and removed the sleeves.

The unpicked shirt

To recut the armholes and the sleeves, I use my existing personal patterns as a guide to cut around.

My newspaper patterns

I wanted short sleeves with a black binding with tiny pleats built into it.

My new cut sleeves

Plain ol' bias binding

I was so absorbed in making the sleeves I forgot to document the process. What you see next is the finished sleeve.

I love bias binding

I love the new sleeve. It looks so much younger, instead of 3/4 length sleeves.

Here’s another view of the sleeve. I really like my sleeve. Can you tell?

Another view of the sleeve

Coming back to the missing midsection. I cut out 2 separate pieces of black stretch knit in a vaguely waist-like shape, the front piece one inch wider than the back, the total measurement, about 3/4 my waist measurement.

The missing midsection

I overlocked the side seams together, forming a tube. Then I joined it to the main garment, right sides together.

Pinning the two pieces together at quarterly intervals

Then I hemmed the bottom with a twin needle.

The finished product

Doesn’t it look soooo much better? I love the new shirt!

White Jacket

1 May

Some time ago, I thought that I’d like to have a white suit to wear to church-actually to William’s baptism on 28 March. I rummaged through my fabricf stash and decided to make a white suit made of a waffle weave white linen that was given to me, trimmed with a navy blue polkadot fabric. This is the sketch I drew.

Fashion Sketch

It would have a shawl collar, and bias bound with the navy blue polkadot trim, with a sewn in belt feature, accompanied by a pencil skirt in the same polkadot fabric.

The chosen fabrics

This would be the first time I attempted a jacket, as well as make my own bias binding. I’ve always been intimidated by the jacket, with its facings, sleeve vents, linings and collars-but I decided to take the plunge this time.

I drafted a jacket block from Winifred Aldrich’s Metric Pattern Cutting for Womenswear.

The Jacket Draft instructions

My personal jacket draft

The shawl collar had to be drafted separately on another piece of paper and attached to the main jacket block.

My shawl collar piece

I decided where I wanted my style lines to be and marked them on the main block with pencil, and traced them out onto newpaper with seam allowances.

My cut pattern pieces

Laying out my pattern pieces on fabric, ready to cut.

The cut fabric

I also cut my interfacing for the jacket facing and the belt.

Interfacing pieces

Next up was the bias binding. I used the continous binding method to make a long chain of binding. I estimated that I needed around 3.5 m of 2.5cm wide binding to go around the jacket. 2.5cm x350cm=875 cm squared, square root of 875 =29.5cm. So I cut a square of polkadot fabric 35cm by 35 cm, and marked 2.5cm intervals on the bias with tailor’s chalk.

Fabric square marked on the bias with chalk every 2.5 cm intervals. The marks are not visible here.

I cut the square into half at a 45 degree angle across the bias

Now place one half of the square on the other side-making a rhombus like the picture. Match all the chalk marks

Sew the two pieces together with a very small seam allowance and press

The rhombus has to be rolled into a tube and joined together, matching all the chalk marks again. This feels very counter intuitive because it feels like the fabric is twisted.

The rolled tube of fabric

Now I just cut the fabric into one long strip following the chalk marks I made.

My bias strip

To make it suitable for binding, like bias binding you buy in a package, I use my bias tape maker.

Pulling the strip through the bias tape maker and pressing as I pull it through.

My bias binding all pressed and ready to go

It was rather satisfying to make that loooong strip of bias tape.

Before I started sewing, I did all the other incidentals like fusing the interfacing into place.

I fused the interfacing to the jacket facing.

My interfaced belt pieces

I sewed the lining pieces together first-to prevent sewing fatigue. You know how you’ve finished the main garment, then look at your lining and sigh-wishing that you didn’t have to do it after all? Well, making the lining first prevents that problem.

The lining pieces

I started sewing all the main garment pieces together and didn’t take pictures because I was in a hurry to finish the jacket. I sewed the binding all around the jacket by hand which took me the better half of two days.

This was the finished jacket.

Finished jacket

HOWEVER- I tried it on. And boy was I disappointed. It didn’t fit!!!! Well. It fitted well enough in the shoulders, and had the jacket been a standard design with no in-built belt, it would have fitted beautifully. But, I didn’t make a muslin, and didn’t anticipate that the draft being a looser fit with standard jacket ease built into it would not carry my design well. My design needed an extremely fitted jacket, with the belt sitting and wrapping the waist precisely. This jacket billowed at the back. And it has so many seams that was I to make the alteration to fit, I’d need to recut the belt piece, as well as take out every seam at the waist, where I counted at least 8 seams. It’s such a pity because I loved the colour combination-it’s so pretty! Grgh! And because it didn’t fit, I haven’t the motivation to finish making the buttonholes nor put in buttons. And now it’s officially an UFO-UnFinished Object. Sigh. I haven’t the heart to make my polkadot pencil skirt either. That’ll teach me to make a muslin next time I make a new draft of something.

Brown Shirt Refashion

30 Apr

Brown Rayon Opshop Shirt

I bought this rayon shirt at the opshop when I was very pregnant. I assumed that just because the shirt fit at the shoulders, it would fit fine after I gave birth. However, I discovered that it was extremely billowyat the bottom and completely shapelesss. The collar was too high as well and the bow didn’t sit properly. I decided to do something about it.

Shapeless

Knowing how well my first refashion turned out, I decided to do the same to this shirt. I planned to lower the collar and cut off the midsection and substitute it with stretch blue ribbed material.

Below I cut off the midsection about 8 inches above the hem.

Cut off midsection of shirt

I then measured myself around the waist and cut off a swatch of blue knit ribbed fabric less 2-3 inches in length, and the same width as the midsection that I cut off from the shirt.

My deep blue ribbed knit

I joined the two raw edges of the ribbed knit to make a tube and overlocked the other raw edges.

Overlocking the raw edges of the blue ribbed knit

Here below I’m overlocking the edges of the brown shirt.

Overlocking the raw edges of the brown shirt.

Next I pinned the ribbed knit tube to the brown shirt right sides together, pinning in quarterly intervals.

Pinning right sides together

This is what it looks like after the tube is sewn on.

Half way there.

To lower the collar, I unpicked the the collar seam and recut the collar to where I wanted it to be.

The unpicked collar

The new collar position.

And I sewed the collar band back on.

Tada!

The finished refashioned shirt.

I like it so much better. Wyld Man likes it too.

Encounter Bay Op Shops

8 Apr

Went on a trip to Kangaroo Island and Encounter Bay over the Easter long weekend. Thought I’d try my luck at the opshops there. Wyld Man was very accomodating-knowing my love for bargains. There were two opshops that I knew of, a Salvos one, and a Lifeline one. However, on this trip I found 2 more, a Save the Children’s Opshop, and one more which seemed new, but didn’t have a name.

I didn’t expect them to be open on Monday, being a religious public holiday, and Salvos and Lifeline being run by volunteers, I was pleasantly surprised to find that I was wrong. I went into Salvos, looking for but not really expecting to find any sewing books-but what do you know, I found a 3 really good books between 1 and 2 dollars each as well as a really nice denim skirt with a flounce, a style which I really love.

Stretch Denim Flounced Skirt. AUD4.50

Another view

I was really glad I found this, because I was actually planning to make one. I already have a similar one which I made with a maternity stretch panel…

My maternity flounced denim skirt

…but it’s become too loose to wear since I gave birth. So this will do nicely.

The books I picked up were these:

1. Singer: How to Sew Fashion Knits

Singer: How to Sew Fashion Knits

Inside

Another look inside

Boring line drawings, but useful information on knits. 99 cents.

2. The Bastford Book of Sewing by Ann Ladbury

The Batsford Book of Sewing

I’ve got no idea why it’s called the BATSFORD book of sewing-there is not explanation inside as to why, and the author is called Ann Ladbury, so I assume it’s not sewing methods that she’s invented, but someone elses. Printed in 1977, has 500 drawings and phtographs, and divided into alphabetical sections starting from Alterations, Belts, to Waistbands and Zips. A little counter-intuitive, as I was puzzled when I first turned the page and straigthaway saw the section on Alterations. Normally sewing books start with fabric and equipment first, before graduating to techniques. I suppose the author decided to make it into a sort of alphabetical sewing dictionary.  Below is an inside look.

Inside

Another page

Another inside look

For 99 cents, a pretty good find.

3. Singer: Children’s Clothes, Toys & Gifts

I was really happy with this one. It’s a Reader’s Digest publication, and I love their books. I have a Reader’s Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, the 70’s edition, and I love it. I found that book at the same Salvos store too.

Singer: Children's Clothes, Toys & Gifts

Elastic Waistbands

Closures

Rugby Plackets

Collars with Faggoting

Insulated Jackets

This book was AUD1.99, but with tons of pictorial guides – totally worth it.

I got the fourth book at a second hand book shop next to Lifeline, called Creative Serging Illustrated by Palmer, Brown and Green. This wasn’t run by a charity organization, so I had to pay AUD5 for this one.

Creative Serging Illustrated

Failsafe Fundamentals

Heirloom Sewing

Flatlocking for a topstitched look.

Books on serging don’t come up very often, so I’m glad I got this one.

At Lifeline, I stumbled on a treasure trove of fabrics. It’s not often that you find fabrics at opshops. Maybe 1 out of 6 opshops will have them? I got at least 20 maters of fabric for AUD20.

My New Stash

I was extremely happy to pick up this all-wool luxury flannel from England, the type for men’s suits. There was at least 3 metres of it. I won’t quit be able to make a suit out of it I don’t think, but defintely a skirt.

Beautiful striped wool flannel.

All Wool Luxury Flannel

It’s been cut into, but there’s still a substantial yardage of it. Yay!

This was another piece of fabric that I picked up-I’m pretty confident it’s a wool, though not as high quality as the one above.

Another wool material

A pretty plaid

I thought the plaid would make great little pants for the Little Wyld Man.

A pretty rose cotton print

Really soft. Would make a pretty dress. Pity winter is coming up.

Knits

I was also lucky enough to come across a bunch of knits, which are quite expensive retail. I snapped up everything they had available.

I love the opshops at Encounter Bay!