Archive | Wardrobe Refashion RSS feed for this section

Vintage Jocardi Camel Coat Relined

3 Oct

In one of my previous posts, I talked about my expanding vintage winter coat collection. One of my favourites is a vintage camel coat which I found at a Salvos opshop a couple of months ago. It was in beautiful condition, and guessing from the cut it was probably of a 50’s-60’s vintage. The brand was Jocardi, and the only reference I could find online was from  a 1957 book about an Italian who had worked in the Jocardi Coat Factory in Canada.

 

Vintage Camel Coat

 

The coat is cut in a very flattering princess style, with topstitching, welt pockets, and a military-looking sleeve head.

 

Interesting sleevehead

 

Being interested in patternmaking myself, I was fascinated with the cut  of the sleeve, which is half set-in sleeve, and half whatchacallit. The whole cut of the coat was very feminine. You wouldn’t be able to get anything like it at the shops today. I especially love the way the skirt flares out.

However, the lining was in pitiful state. It was moth-eaten, ripped under the sleeves, threadbare, stained and torn in a few places. And it was a really awful pink typical of that vintage. Not to mention that it smelled something horrible.

But when I tried it on, I fell in love with the way it looked on me-it fitted me exactly, and I didn’t have that colour coat in my collection. The price tag on it was $35-which was a little high for an opshop, and I hesitated when I thought about the lining. But I convinced myself that it could be easily relined. The clincher came when I realised that it had a purple tag and it was half price day for purple tags! My parents were with me at the time and my dad offered to pay for it. So sweet of him. They both said the coat looked beautiful. And you don’t argue with your parents on that one.

So I got back home and sat on it for a week and studied it inside and out. And proceeded to rip the lining out and apart.

 

Lining front

 

 

Lining back

 

As you can see, the lining has an underlining made of cotton flannel, and the back has  a rectangle of suede sewn onto it. I took pictures of how the lining inside was constructed and attached and made notes so as to guide me  later. My plan was to rip one side of the  lining  apart at the seams, and leave the other side intact, then use the lining  pieces as a pattern for the new lining.

 

Lining pattern pieces

 

The lining pieces had to be ironed flat first. And I had to measure the seam allowance on it to determine how much to sew on the new lining.

I was set on a really funky lining, and had in mind some loud polyester fabric leftover from a maternity dress, which I got from  the bargain table at Spotlight.

 

Print maternity dress (See the Wyld Maternity Collection 2009 here)

 

To underline it, I used some tan wool crepe in my stash (which again came from an opshop). It wasn’t an attractive colour, and had some holes in it, but being an underlining, it didn’t matter too much.  I but both lining and underlining using the old lining pattern pieces.

 

New lining pieces

 

I made sure to mark the darks on both fabrics, then sewed the outline of the darts through both fabric layers.

 

Dart outline

 

I also sewed around the edges of all the lining and underlining pieces together, treating them both as a single layer from then on. For the back panels however, I joined the centre back seam of both fabrics together, but before sewing the edges of both fabrics, I sewed the suede rectangle onto the underlining. Then I sewed the edges of the lining and underlining together, treating it as a single layer from  then on. I then proceed to join all the pieces together, as well as attaching the sleeves.

Now comes  the big part-joining the lining to the coat. I sewed the lining edge to the coat facing, right sides together, all around from the middle of the collar down one side, and then down the other. This ensures that you don’t end up with one side of the lining longer or shorter than the other. It also means that the middle of the collar of the lining and the coat will match up. Now all that is needed is the hemming of sleeve and hem.

The sleeves were 1 1/2 inches too short-so I lengthened it. Luckily the hem inside was quite generous which allowed me to do that. Otherwise it would have looked a bit funny on me. I had cut the sleeve lining longer to accomodate  that alteration.

And this is the finished product.

 

New lining

 

 

Front view

 

 

Inside view

 

With the leftovers of the print lining, I made a square scarf to match (edges finished with a rolled hem on the overlocker) and a hair scrunchy.

I sent the coat to be drycleaned before I wore it. And I have worn it many many times over the last two months. I love this coat, and especially the lining. I feel like I’ve got a wonderful secret hidden under a demure coat. The loud print sings to me and to anyone I’ve shown it to.

Take note  however that if you remove the labels from the old lining to insert the care instructions for the coat into the new lining, because the dry cleaners might make you sign a waiver/indemnity in case of possible damage due to there being no care label.
This was a quick project and very satisfying. And it’s not that hard to do. So next time you see a beautiful coat with an old lining, rescue it and give it an internal facelift.

More Opshop Goodness and a Hat Refashion

9 Jun

Went to the opshops twice last week-once after my dental checkup (a follow up root canal treatment), and last Saturday. Saturdays are the only time I get to go out to the shops alone-Little Wyld Man stays with his daddy at home. And since I’ve started him on solids, he is a teeny weeny less dependant on me as Wyld Man can feed him something if he’s hungry. As much as I enjoy my little man’s company, I do miss my opshopping jaunts, which I used to do before he was born. So Saturdays are reserved for grocery shopping, opshopping, and an occasional visit to the library. Anyways, last Wednesday, I dropped into the Salvos on Smart Road.

For the benefit of my Malaysian readers back home, Salvos stands for Salvation Army, a charitable institution who franchises their charity opshops into what is now a huge opshop chain. Vinnies is another opshop set-up, short for St Vincent de Paul, a Catholic run organisation. These two are the main opshop operations in South Australia, but there are other numerous opshops around. People donate things they want to get rid off which are in usable condition, and the opshop volunteers clean them and price them. People come in and buy an item, and the money goes to fund a charitable cause. In recent times however, it has become fashionable and trendy to opshop, as people go ‘green’, tightening spending during recession times, and as ‘vintage’ becoming the by-word in fashion. As a result, prices in opshops are getting steeper and steeper, which goes against the whole ethos of opshopping. On this trip, I saw a beautiful checked coat, rather old, with a stained and ripped lining selling for AUD25 at Salvos! I can get a brand new Target one for AUD30! And Wyld Man once saw an old army issue wool coat, probably made during the Vietnam war, selling for AUD90 at a Victor HArbour  Salvos opshop. It wasn’t old enough to be a collector’s item, nor in a good condition enough to warrant that price, which was outrageous in an opshop. I saw a wool men’s overcoat at Peter Shearer’s brand new for only AUD 124.  In the one year I have been here, I’ve seen prices increase quite substantially. And Vinnies is the same. I’d like to support Vinnies more, being a Catholic-run organisation, but at those prices, I’d think again and let the prices decide.

Anyways, during my Wednesday jaunt, I picked this up.

Summer knit dress

It is in extremely good condition, almost brand new, in a size 8. It was a teeny weensy bit tight, but, hey, it was only AUD7, so what the heck. I tried it on and couldn’t resist, the print was so pretty. And pink! I don’t know what the deal is with the straps though. I’ll cut it off sometime.

I recently taken to wearing hats to church, instead of veils, and have been keeping a lookout for nice hats in opshops. I’ve got two already, but wanted something to match my brown winter coat. And I came across this.

Brown hat with turned down rim

It is very similar to my navy blue hat.

Navy Blue Hat

I love this hat. It goes with almost everything. I had made a mental note to myself to buy one in brown if I ever see one with that turned down rim design. Lots of op shops carry brown straw hats but with a flat brim. I’ve never liked those. This design however looks leagues better.

The brown hat however has loads of this.

Plastic flowers

It looks ok in the pictures, but there’s too many of them, and they’re old and dusty. The kiss of death for hats. And I know that I’d never wear it to church as they are. And not in winter-they were a bit too spring-y. So, I ripped them off.

Naked hat.

You can still see the price tag on the hat-AUD4.

So I did a refashion.

Hat refashion

I based it on my blue hat, and used brown satin that I had lying around, with the insides fused with interfacing for some weight and substance.

New and improved.

I would definitely wear this version. I had planned to wear the bow at the back, like the blue hat, but I think the bow looks better in front on this one.

Aside from those buys, I also snagged 2 jumpers at Vinnies on Saturday.

White oversized chenille acrylic jumper

I love the oversized look-big top and a narrow bottom. The narrow waist band and the cuffs gives it shape and makes the oversized look look like it was done on purpose. Here’s another view.

View B

Here’s the second white jumper I bought at Vinnies.

Cable knit white jumper

I loove loove cable knits. Wyld Man asked me why I needed so many white ones. Because. I. Need. It. And. Want. It. And. It. Was. Cheap. AUD 13 for the two of them. And I think those are REALLY good reasons.

Here’s a picture I took of the Little Wyld Man this morning.

William in a bonnet

All rugged up for winter. He will be 16 weeks old this Friday, and 4 months old on the 19th of June.

White Polkadot Wrap Shirt Refashion

7 May

Some time ago I bought a size 12 Marco Polo white wraparound polkadot shirt at a flea market for $5. I didn’t try it on, but I love love love polkadots and thought that size 12 should be okay on me. However, whenever I thought to wear it somewhere, it just never looked right on me. It wasn’t THAT big, but it didn’t fit very well on me. I offered it to a friend, thinking it would be a bit of a shame to cut it up-but she didn’t think it was her style. So, I thought, what the heck-I’ll just refashion it. I’ve had it for more than 6 months and never wore it nor done anything to it because, well, it was really pretty by itself. I was afraid of mucking up something.Now if I did something at last,  at least I’d wear it.

This is what it looks like before.

The Polkadot Wraparound Shirt

It makes me think of a nurse’s uniform somehow. The bow would never sit right and it felt that the sleeves were an awkward length on me.

I decided to recut the whole shirt to fit me better- at the sleeves and armholes, and at the side seams. And as in my other two refashions, to cut off the midsection and substitute with black stretch knit.

I cut off the midsection first-just folded the shirt in half and eyeballed it. I didn’t really measure anything this time. I pinned the wrap fronts together before I started cutting.

Cutting off the midsection

Next, I unpicked the side seams and the armhole seams and removed the sleeves.

The unpicked shirt

To recut the armholes and the sleeves, I use my existing personal patterns as a guide to cut around.

My newspaper patterns

I wanted short sleeves with a black binding with tiny pleats built into it.

My new cut sleeves

Plain ol' bias binding

I was so absorbed in making the sleeves I forgot to document the process. What you see next is the finished sleeve.

I love bias binding

I love the new sleeve. It looks so much younger, instead of 3/4 length sleeves.

Here’s another view of the sleeve. I really like my sleeve. Can you tell?

Another view of the sleeve

Coming back to the missing midsection. I cut out 2 separate pieces of black stretch knit in a vaguely waist-like shape, the front piece one inch wider than the back, the total measurement, about 3/4 my waist measurement.

The missing midsection

I overlocked the side seams together, forming a tube. Then I joined it to the main garment, right sides together.

Pinning the two pieces together at quarterly intervals

Then I hemmed the bottom with a twin needle.

The finished product

Doesn’t it look soooo much better? I love the new shirt!

Brown Shirt Refashion

30 Apr

Brown Rayon Opshop Shirt

I bought this rayon shirt at the opshop when I was very pregnant. I assumed that just because the shirt fit at the shoulders, it would fit fine after I gave birth. However, I discovered that it was extremely billowyat the bottom and completely shapelesss. The collar was too high as well and the bow didn’t sit properly. I decided to do something about it.

Shapeless

Knowing how well my first refashion turned out, I decided to do the same to this shirt. I planned to lower the collar and cut off the midsection and substitute it with stretch blue ribbed material.

Below I cut off the midsection about 8 inches above the hem.

Cut off midsection of shirt

I then measured myself around the waist and cut off a swatch of blue knit ribbed fabric less 2-3 inches in length, and the same width as the midsection that I cut off from the shirt.

My deep blue ribbed knit

I joined the two raw edges of the ribbed knit to make a tube and overlocked the other raw edges.

Overlocking the raw edges of the blue ribbed knit

Here below I’m overlocking the edges of the brown shirt.

Overlocking the raw edges of the brown shirt.

Next I pinned the ribbed knit tube to the brown shirt right sides together, pinning in quarterly intervals.

Pinning right sides together

This is what it looks like after the tube is sewn on.

Half way there.

To lower the collar, I unpicked the the collar seam and recut the collar to where I wanted it to be.

The unpicked collar

The new collar position.

And I sewed the collar band back on.

Tada!

The finished refashioned shirt.

I like it so much better. Wyld Man likes it too.

White Shirt Refashion

7 Apr

My lovely mother-in-law picked up a size 10 white shirt from the op-shop for me. It was just my size and looked just like this.

White Shirt

But it’s a little boring. And a little too office-ey? And I don’t generally wear shirts like these. However, I had an idea brewing at the back of my mind to refashion it into something else.

I decided to cut off the sleeve and the midriff section.

Measuring the underbust

I had to determine how high the underbust line was.

Measuring the sleeve

I made a mark at the sleeve at the same height as the underbust line.

Ouch!

I then proceeded to cut the sleeve and the midriff off at the marks. My mum wasn’t convinced of the soundness of this-seemed a perfectly fine shirt to ruin. But I forged ahead.

The slashed and unrescuable shirt.

Replacing the cut sections with wide strips of black stretch material.

I intended to replace the lower bodice with black stretch fabric that I got from the op-shop, as well as make cuffs from the same material as the sleeve. I measured around my waist and cut a strip of fabric 2/3 my waist measurement in width, and twice the original cut-off bodice length. This is because I want a double fold of stretch black material to go around the my abdomen. I cut cuffs also 2/3 my arm measurement, and about 5 inches in lengh, which again will be doubled so that I have a double fold cuff.

I didn’t show the steps here, but I overlocked the edges of the white shirt at the sleeves and the bodice, and sewed the stretch material onto it.

Voila!

My mum was impressed and conceded that I was right. Wyld Man loves this shirt and I wore it to the Little Wyld Man’s christening.