Archive | Shopping RSS feed for this section

Blackwood Opshops

13 Oct

When I first came to Australia and discovered opshops, somebody told me I had to go to the Blackwood opshops. I didn’t find the time to till last week, when I went to visit some friends there, who babysat the Little Wyld Man while mummy went-a-shopping.

Blackwood, for those unfamiliar to Adelaide, is south of Adelaide, and situated in the hills. It has 5 opshops within a small shopping radius, the best and biggest being the Salvos one. There are also the Save the Children Opshop, Redcross, Goodwill, and the RSPCA thrift shop. See here for addresses.

I went to the Salvos one first, which was the most famous. Inside was the most organized and appealing  layout I’d ever seen in an opshop, being almost boutique-like in a rustic way. That said however, I didn’t find anything  to buy. There was a trouser press being sold for $60 displayed outside, but I don’t iron enough trousers to justify buying it. But if it had been a gravity feed iron/steam generator, that would have been a different story.

The next opshop I went to was the Redcross one. Here I spied an almost brand new shawl-collared white cardigan which I snatched up.

White Cardigan

Originally it had two ties sewn in to tie the front together which I removed. I also tacked the collar in place so that it would stay in that shape instead of collapsing. I’ve worn it out twice within the last week already. $6.99. Kaching!

I also found a dressmaking book, Success with Dress by Ellen and Marietta Resek.

Success with Dress

I hummed and harred about it, but was sold when I saw that it had a section on drafting patterns.

Bodice Drafts

This is an Aussie book, and very well written. Every chapter starts with a cute little rhyme, and it covers most of the basics in dressmaking.  The sleeve draft was good, being an assymetrical sleeve. (Sleeves shouldn’t look the same front and back, the front of the sleeve has less material, and the back has more-some books get it wrong). I have an earlier book by the same authors called Successful Dressmaking, which I posted about here. $3.

I went to Save the Children Opshop next, and here I picked up some fabrics-a nude and a red tricot fabric, perfect for petticoats and lining knit garments. I also found a nice wool felt hat in cream.

Cream Felt Hat

This is a back view.

Back view

I’m not so crazy about the way the grosgrain ribbon trim is finished at the back. I think it needs something more. I haven’t decided what to do about it yet. $4.99

I also found a sewing box for $9. I thought it was a bit steep for an opshop, but I really wanted and needed one, and Spotlight sells them for $20. I’ve been sewing out of a Tupperware container, so I’m glad to have this.

Sewing box

Inside peek

No, it didn’t come with tools and notions. *pout*. Wyld Man says it looks almost exactly like his mother’s.

The last stop was at Goodwill. I didn’t find anything that I liked until I was almost leaving and then I saw this.

Buckram hat with feathers

I really, really liked it. However, the feathers were a little scraggly, and the ribbon wasn’t glued on properly. I bought it, and I’m going to refashion it one of  this  days. This is a hat for spring, while the other one was a wintery one. $6.50.

So that’s all from Blackwood. I didn’t go to the RSPCA one because my friend/tour guide said it wasn’t any good, and I also wanted to get back to Little Wyld Man. I needn’t have worried though, he was very good and didn’t miss me at all!

And while I’m posting about all things opshop, I found this little top at the St Agnes Save the Children Opshop some weeks ago and loved it.

Red Polka Dot Top

Makes me feel like Minnie Mouse! Love it! $3. The camisole came from an opshop too. Can’t remember where from now.

What did you find at the opshops?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage Jocardi Camel Coat Relined

3 Oct

In one of my previous posts, I talked about my expanding vintage winter coat collection. One of my favourites is a vintage camel coat which I found at a Salvos opshop a couple of months ago. It was in beautiful condition, and guessing from the cut it was probably of a 50’s-60’s vintage. The brand was Jocardi, and the only reference I could find online was from  a 1957 book about an Italian who had worked in the Jocardi Coat Factory in Canada.

 

Vintage Camel Coat

 

The coat is cut in a very flattering princess style, with topstitching, welt pockets, and a military-looking sleeve head.

 

Interesting sleevehead

 

Being interested in patternmaking myself, I was fascinated with the cut  of the sleeve, which is half set-in sleeve, and half whatchacallit. The whole cut of the coat was very feminine. You wouldn’t be able to get anything like it at the shops today. I especially love the way the skirt flares out.

However, the lining was in pitiful state. It was moth-eaten, ripped under the sleeves, threadbare, stained and torn in a few places. And it was a really awful pink typical of that vintage. Not to mention that it smelled something horrible.

But when I tried it on, I fell in love with the way it looked on me-it fitted me exactly, and I didn’t have that colour coat in my collection. The price tag on it was $35-which was a little high for an opshop, and I hesitated when I thought about the lining. But I convinced myself that it could be easily relined. The clincher came when I realised that it had a purple tag and it was half price day for purple tags! My parents were with me at the time and my dad offered to pay for it. So sweet of him. They both said the coat looked beautiful. And you don’t argue with your parents on that one.

So I got back home and sat on it for a week and studied it inside and out. And proceeded to rip the lining out and apart.

 

Lining front

 

 

Lining back

 

As you can see, the lining has an underlining made of cotton flannel, and the back has  a rectangle of suede sewn onto it. I took pictures of how the lining inside was constructed and attached and made notes so as to guide me  later. My plan was to rip one side of the  lining  apart at the seams, and leave the other side intact, then use the lining  pieces as a pattern for the new lining.

 

Lining pattern pieces

 

The lining pieces had to be ironed flat first. And I had to measure the seam allowance on it to determine how much to sew on the new lining.

I was set on a really funky lining, and had in mind some loud polyester fabric leftover from a maternity dress, which I got from  the bargain table at Spotlight.

 

Print maternity dress (See the Wyld Maternity Collection 2009 here)

 

To underline it, I used some tan wool crepe in my stash (which again came from an opshop). It wasn’t an attractive colour, and had some holes in it, but being an underlining, it didn’t matter too much.  I but both lining and underlining using the old lining pattern pieces.

 

New lining pieces

 

I made sure to mark the darks on both fabrics, then sewed the outline of the darts through both fabric layers.

 

Dart outline

 

I also sewed around the edges of all the lining and underlining pieces together, treating them both as a single layer from then on. For the back panels however, I joined the centre back seam of both fabrics together, but before sewing the edges of both fabrics, I sewed the suede rectangle onto the underlining. Then I sewed the edges of the lining and underlining together, treating it as a single layer from  then on. I then proceed to join all the pieces together, as well as attaching the sleeves.

Now comes  the big part-joining the lining to the coat. I sewed the lining edge to the coat facing, right sides together, all around from the middle of the collar down one side, and then down the other. This ensures that you don’t end up with one side of the lining longer or shorter than the other. It also means that the middle of the collar of the lining and the coat will match up. Now all that is needed is the hemming of sleeve and hem.

The sleeves were 1 1/2 inches too short-so I lengthened it. Luckily the hem inside was quite generous which allowed me to do that. Otherwise it would have looked a bit funny on me. I had cut the sleeve lining longer to accomodate  that alteration.

And this is the finished product.

 

New lining

 

 

Front view

 

 

Inside view

 

With the leftovers of the print lining, I made a square scarf to match (edges finished with a rolled hem on the overlocker) and a hair scrunchy.

I sent the coat to be drycleaned before I wore it. And I have worn it many many times over the last two months. I love this coat, and especially the lining. I feel like I’ve got a wonderful secret hidden under a demure coat. The loud print sings to me and to anyone I’ve shown it to.

Take note  however that if you remove the labels from the old lining to insert the care instructions for the coat into the new lining, because the dry cleaners might make you sign a waiver/indemnity in case of possible damage due to there being no care label.
This was a quick project and very satisfying. And it’s not that hard to do. So next time you see a beautiful coat with an old lining, rescue it and give it an internal facelift.

Opshop Finds On My Birthday

13 Jul

Yesterday I turned 26. It doesn’t feel like another year has passed and that I’m a year older and only four more years away from the big three-O. In my head I still feel like a giddy 18-year-old. We had a quiet celebration with the family on Sunday night. The Wednesday before, Wyld Man and I had a special night out to celebrate both our birthdays-we’re both July babies. I got a Mileni bag as a present from the family, as well as a gift card at Suzannegrae.

Mileni bag

It’s a huge bag-I carried it around yesterday with one of the compartments with my stuff, and the other half with William’s stuff-nappy, squirt bottle, a bottle of water, nappy change mat, bib, hanky and a stuffed toy!

Anyways, yesterday morning I caught up with a playgroup mummy and she brought me to her favourite opshop! It’s run by the Uniting Church and is quite small, but I still managed to bag quite a haul. I got a few things for myself…

Opshop outfit

The tan crossover top was AUD1.75,  and the angora wool skirt was AUD3.  I especially love the skirt, with is a thick stretchy knit, quite warm and perfect for winter outfits. The only thing is that with tights, it tends to ride up unless I make a lining for it, which I shall.

I also got myself a couple of belts for 50cents each-I keep wearing mine out.

I got William a few things-lots of bibs and some little outfits like…

Marks and Spencer red striped 2 set

…for AUD3. And a couple of Wondersuits…

Wondersuits

…for a dollar each.

I also picked up 2 metres of a lovely winter weight wool twill.

Twill fabric

I’m in the middle of cutting it out for a skirt. I’ve decided to make another Vogue 8426-inspired skirt.

When I came home later that day, I had this given to me.

My Little Wyld Man's card for me

He’d even signed it!

Signed by William

Isn’t it the cutest little scribble ever?

And this was his and daddy’s present to me.

365 Day Cookbook

A friend on Facebook reminded me of how blessed I was to have my very own knight and prince.*Sigh*. Happy.

Vogue Skirt-Check.

24 Jun

Vogue 8246

I’ve spent the last 3 days making that Vogue 8426 -inspired skirt I blogged about on the previous post and took pictures today. From the start to finish, I told myself that it was going to be a mock-up/test garment/muslin instead of the real thing in order to test the fit of my drafting, and then to later make other versions of it if it was successful. However, I also wanted to make it a wearable muslin. I was quite determined to use fabric from my stash, and only to buy little incidentals like zippers if absolutely necessary. The path to the  end was frought with mishaps, with me miscutting the front centre piece NOT on the fold, and having to piece another bit of fabric to make up for it, then I discovered a hole in the skirt fabric, then after that, I couldnt’ insert the lapped zipper properly. Also, this was my first time inserting corded piping, so the results aren’t as uniform as it should be.

After reading about SewVeryPrairies’ skirt here, I thought and thought about how to draft the skirt. The front of the skirt was quite easy to draft. It was the back which had me puzzled for a bit. The bum-hugging shaping of the back of skirt has to be built into the 3 seams at the back, which ends in inverted pleats. This was what I came up with.

drafts and doodles...

It was quite successful-although for the skirt to hug the bum even more, I’d have to curve in the seams even more inwards. But I’m quite happy with my skirt as it is.

The materials I used were a dark grey crepe material, a silvery rayon? fabric, and bemberg lining.

Fabrics

Here are the pattern pieces laid out on fashion fabric ready to be all cut out.

Ready to cut.

I wanted my skirt to have piping details in the lower waist seams and on the side, but didn’t want to buy ready made piping-so I made my own. I started by cutting 1-inch wide bias strips with the grey fashion fabric.

Bias strips

Instead of buying cord for the piping, I used some regular knitting yarn.

Knitting yarn.

I used a zipper foot to sew the yarn into the piping.

Handmade corded piping

I was too lazy to take pictures of the process in between. But here are the photos of the finished project.

Front view

Back View

Side View

Closeup

The whole project cost me nothing-I used everything out of my stash, most of which came from opshops.

Not too bad for a mock-up. I’ll be making more soon.

My little man was very good-he just smiled at me from his little rocker as I hammer away on my sewing machine. How lucky am I?

More Opshop Goodness and a Hat Refashion

9 Jun

Went to the opshops twice last week-once after my dental checkup (a follow up root canal treatment), and last Saturday. Saturdays are the only time I get to go out to the shops alone-Little Wyld Man stays with his daddy at home. And since I’ve started him on solids, he is a teeny weeny less dependant on me as Wyld Man can feed him something if he’s hungry. As much as I enjoy my little man’s company, I do miss my opshopping jaunts, which I used to do before he was born. So Saturdays are reserved for grocery shopping, opshopping, and an occasional visit to the library. Anyways, last Wednesday, I dropped into the Salvos on Smart Road.

For the benefit of my Malaysian readers back home, Salvos stands for Salvation Army, a charitable institution who franchises their charity opshops into what is now a huge opshop chain. Vinnies is another opshop set-up, short for St Vincent de Paul, a Catholic run organisation. These two are the main opshop operations in South Australia, but there are other numerous opshops around. People donate things they want to get rid off which are in usable condition, and the opshop volunteers clean them and price them. People come in and buy an item, and the money goes to fund a charitable cause. In recent times however, it has become fashionable and trendy to opshop, as people go ‘green’, tightening spending during recession times, and as ‘vintage’ becoming the by-word in fashion. As a result, prices in opshops are getting steeper and steeper, which goes against the whole ethos of opshopping. On this trip, I saw a beautiful checked coat, rather old, with a stained and ripped lining selling for AUD25 at Salvos! I can get a brand new Target one for AUD30! And Wyld Man once saw an old army issue wool coat, probably made during the Vietnam war, selling for AUD90 at a Victor HArbour  Salvos opshop. It wasn’t old enough to be a collector’s item, nor in a good condition enough to warrant that price, which was outrageous in an opshop. I saw a wool men’s overcoat at Peter Shearer’s brand new for only AUD 124.  In the one year I have been here, I’ve seen prices increase quite substantially. And Vinnies is the same. I’d like to support Vinnies more, being a Catholic-run organisation, but at those prices, I’d think again and let the prices decide.

Anyways, during my Wednesday jaunt, I picked this up.

Summer knit dress

It is in extremely good condition, almost brand new, in a size 8. It was a teeny weensy bit tight, but, hey, it was only AUD7, so what the heck. I tried it on and couldn’t resist, the print was so pretty. And pink! I don’t know what the deal is with the straps though. I’ll cut it off sometime.

I recently taken to wearing hats to church, instead of veils, and have been keeping a lookout for nice hats in opshops. I’ve got two already, but wanted something to match my brown winter coat. And I came across this.

Brown hat with turned down rim

It is very similar to my navy blue hat.

Navy Blue Hat

I love this hat. It goes with almost everything. I had made a mental note to myself to buy one in brown if I ever see one with that turned down rim design. Lots of op shops carry brown straw hats but with a flat brim. I’ve never liked those. This design however looks leagues better.

The brown hat however has loads of this.

Plastic flowers

It looks ok in the pictures, but there’s too many of them, and they’re old and dusty. The kiss of death for hats. And I know that I’d never wear it to church as they are. And not in winter-they were a bit too spring-y. So, I ripped them off.

Naked hat.

You can still see the price tag on the hat-AUD4.

So I did a refashion.

Hat refashion

I based it on my blue hat, and used brown satin that I had lying around, with the insides fused with interfacing for some weight and substance.

New and improved.

I would definitely wear this version. I had planned to wear the bow at the back, like the blue hat, but I think the bow looks better in front on this one.

Aside from those buys, I also snagged 2 jumpers at Vinnies on Saturday.

White oversized chenille acrylic jumper

I love the oversized look-big top and a narrow bottom. The narrow waist band and the cuffs gives it shape and makes the oversized look look like it was done on purpose. Here’s another view.

View B

Here’s the second white jumper I bought at Vinnies.

Cable knit white jumper

I loove loove cable knits. Wyld Man asked me why I needed so many white ones. Because. I. Need. It. And. Want. It. And. It. Was. Cheap. AUD 13 for the two of them. And I think those are REALLY good reasons.

Here’s a picture I took of the Little Wyld Man this morning.

William in a bonnet

All rugged up for winter. He will be 16 weeks old this Friday, and 4 months old on the 19th of June.

A Root Canal, A Dentist, and Opping It!

23 May

I had to have an emergency root canal done two Fridays ago at 10pm. I’ve had twinges of pain for three days prior, but I ignored it because, well, it was manageable. My appointment was for the first week of June. However, it did come to the point where I thought I might need to have it seen to earlier, so the dental receptionist booked me in for a Monday, three days to go. She also gave me an emergency number to call, just in case, which at that point, I really didn’t think I’d need.  That Friday night however the pain escalated and I had to have my tooth done that night pronto. I was all dressed and ready to go for a birthday party that night at 7pm-but I was humming and harring about whether it was a good idea to go. In hindsight, I’m glad I went. That dinner would have been torture had I not gone to the dentist, who was all the way on the other side of the city to where we live.

Who I went to is another interesting story. His name was Dr Daniel Chu, and I didn’t think much of it when the receptionist gave me his name. On meeting him however, I thought he definitely had a Malaysian accent. He asked me where I was from, and I said I was Malaysian. He said he was too. What race was I? Half Kadazan, half Chinese. Kadazan! he exclaims! That’s from Sabah! Where he was from too. I asked him which school he went to, and he said he graduated from Tshung Tsin Pre University, which was the same place I went for high school! And his dad is a GP at Gaya Street and knows my dad! Talk about a small world. Anyways, he did a very quick job on my tooth and told me that there was an infection at the root and it was only 2cm away from the sinuses, and had the infection gone there, there would have been some nasty facial swelling. So I was doubly glad I forgoed the dinner and had my tooth done.

I had my follow up at my regular dentist on Monday-and lucky me, there was a Salvos next door. So of course I went. Sigh. Not that I need anymore clothes. But I do love bargains. And if there was a really nice piece for a really good price…Anyways, these were the two things I got.

3/4 Cardigan

The camera didn’t capture the really pretty buttercuppy colour. It looks almost brand new and it was only $3. I love the way it goes with a lilac camisole.

I also got this Barkins skirt for $3.5

Barkins skirt

Grandma also got me a really pretty red knitted cardigan from her local craft shop. It looks really vintage-y looking, and a really brilliant red. I love it!

Red knitted cardigan

I’ve always love knitted sweaters and cardis and was never able to wear them in Malaysia. I love being able to wear them now. And vintage is the in thing right now.

Have a great Sunday

Wyld Woman

Opshop Treasures and Other Bargains

1 May

I had the car last Thursday and went out shopping with a friend. Ita was the lovely church lady who gave me a stack of fabrics to start my stash. She had told me about an opshop at St Aidan’s Anglican Church on the corner of OG and Payneham Rd which was only open in the mornings till noon. So we both went there to have a little browse. I was looking for jumpers and winter things, but was told that the winter things was only coming out on Saturday when they were having a fete. I wasn’t too disappointed, as I picked up a pretty red Portman’s knitted, short-sleeved turtleneck for $3.

Red Portmans top

However, Little Wyld Man needed his nappy changed, so I went into the hall-where the fete was going to be. And all the winter things were hanging on the rack-the lady in charge said I could have a look if I wanted and if I wanted to buy anything I was welcome to. I went to have a quick browse, not really thinking I’d get anything, seeing as there were more coats than jumpers, and I was after the latter. However, I came across this gorgeous 7/8 wool winter coat with faux fur trim on the collar and on the sleeve, with princess lines but in a swing coat style. I tried it on and Ita and the other salesladies gasped-they said it was so Audrey Hepburn and soooo elegant and sooo me!

A Frontal View

A Back View

Another View

The brand was Steve by Searle and on the care label it said CLEAN BY FUR METHOD DO NOT BRUSH PRESS OR STEAM. I went online after that and found www.searlenyc.com and guess what-all of their coats were in upwards of USD400 to 900, although right now they’re having a half price sale. I also found the very same coat in black sold on ebay second hand at a starting bid of USD70. It stated that the coat was 70% wool, 20% nylon and 10% cashmere. And guess how much I paid for it at the opshop? $10. Yes. $10. I love the thrill of finding something so beautiful for next to nothing.

The next opshop we went was the Enfield Baptist Church opshop off Hampstead Rd. There, I picked up another red turtleneck and a brown long cardigan, both for $4. I was in a hurry and didn’t try either of them. But they fit me perfectly, and Wyld Man especially likes the latter.

Red Turtleneck

Another view.

Those boots were on sale at Harris Scarfe’s. I wasn’t looking for any when I was there, but Wyld Man’s been telling me to get another pair, because I keep complaining that pair I have pinches my toes. These were pure leather, and fully lined with leather as well. They were selling retail for $219.95 but was on manager’s special for…..$39.95. And I bought them. And love them. They are sooo comfortable. The buckles are on a strap that can be taken off, so I can have 2 different looks too. 2 weeks ago I saw some at BigW for $70, and they were only PVC and I told Wyld Man that I was sure I could get some real leather one’s for that price. And I was right.

My brown long cardigan

This brown long cardi is very young, very versatile and very trendy. I can wear it with practically anything and it keeps me warm.

The next stop was Rivers. They had a catalogue in the newspaper selling women’s cable knits for $14. I had to go and have a look to see whether they were worth buying. I’d have to pay$60-70 for knitted jumpers in a shop, $14 for a cable knit is very very good. Even opshops sell them for about $7 each. I got three.

A olive green shawl neck cable knit.

I also got the shawl neck one in black.

A silver turtleneck cable knit

Total spent for 7 items-$63. A pretty good day’s work. I’m all set for winter.

Encounter Bay Op Shops

8 Apr

Went on a trip to Kangaroo Island and Encounter Bay over the Easter long weekend. Thought I’d try my luck at the opshops there. Wyld Man was very accomodating-knowing my love for bargains. There were two opshops that I knew of, a Salvos one, and a Lifeline one. However, on this trip I found 2 more, a Save the Children’s Opshop, and one more which seemed new, but didn’t have a name.

I didn’t expect them to be open on Monday, being a religious public holiday, and Salvos and Lifeline being run by volunteers, I was pleasantly surprised to find that I was wrong. I went into Salvos, looking for but not really expecting to find any sewing books-but what do you know, I found a 3 really good books between 1 and 2 dollars each as well as a really nice denim skirt with a flounce, a style which I really love.

Stretch Denim Flounced Skirt. AUD4.50

Another view

I was really glad I found this, because I was actually planning to make one. I already have a similar one which I made with a maternity stretch panel…

My maternity flounced denim skirt

…but it’s become too loose to wear since I gave birth. So this will do nicely.

The books I picked up were these:

1. Singer: How to Sew Fashion Knits

Singer: How to Sew Fashion Knits

Inside

Another look inside

Boring line drawings, but useful information on knits. 99 cents.

2. The Bastford Book of Sewing by Ann Ladbury

The Batsford Book of Sewing

I’ve got no idea why it’s called the BATSFORD book of sewing-there is not explanation inside as to why, and the author is called Ann Ladbury, so I assume it’s not sewing methods that she’s invented, but someone elses. Printed in 1977, has 500 drawings and phtographs, and divided into alphabetical sections starting from Alterations, Belts, to Waistbands and Zips. A little counter-intuitive, as I was puzzled when I first turned the page and straigthaway saw the section on Alterations. Normally sewing books start with fabric and equipment first, before graduating to techniques. I suppose the author decided to make it into a sort of alphabetical sewing dictionary.  Below is an inside look.

Inside

Another page

Another inside look

For 99 cents, a pretty good find.

3. Singer: Children’s Clothes, Toys & Gifts

I was really happy with this one. It’s a Reader’s Digest publication, and I love their books. I have a Reader’s Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, the 70’s edition, and I love it. I found that book at the same Salvos store too.

Singer: Children's Clothes, Toys & Gifts

Elastic Waistbands

Closures

Rugby Plackets

Collars with Faggoting

Insulated Jackets

This book was AUD1.99, but with tons of pictorial guides – totally worth it.

I got the fourth book at a second hand book shop next to Lifeline, called Creative Serging Illustrated by Palmer, Brown and Green. This wasn’t run by a charity organization, so I had to pay AUD5 for this one.

Creative Serging Illustrated

Failsafe Fundamentals

Heirloom Sewing

Flatlocking for a topstitched look.

Books on serging don’t come up very often, so I’m glad I got this one.

At Lifeline, I stumbled on a treasure trove of fabrics. It’s not often that you find fabrics at opshops. Maybe 1 out of 6 opshops will have them? I got at least 20 maters of fabric for AUD20.

My New Stash

I was extremely happy to pick up this all-wool luxury flannel from England, the type for men’s suits. There was at least 3 metres of it. I won’t quit be able to make a suit out of it I don’t think, but defintely a skirt.

Beautiful striped wool flannel.

All Wool Luxury Flannel

It’s been cut into, but there’s still a substantial yardage of it. Yay!

This was another piece of fabric that I picked up-I’m pretty confident it’s a wool, though not as high quality as the one above.

Another wool material

A pretty plaid

I thought the plaid would make great little pants for the Little Wyld Man.

A pretty rose cotton print

Really soft. Would make a pretty dress. Pity winter is coming up.

Knits

I was also lucky enough to come across a bunch of knits, which are quite expensive retail. I snapped up everything they had available.

I love the opshops at Encounter Bay!

Sewing and Pattern Drafting Books

14 Feb

Last week I found a Winifred Aldrich book on Metric Pattern Drafting for Men’s Wear on Ebay selling for AUD16 dollars and won a bid on it. At Dymocks I paid for my Women’s Wear one for AUD 75! I thought it was a bargain for 16 dollars. But I had to go and pick it up from the seller at Brighton Carboot Market, which is South West from where we live. Saved me about AUD12 in postage. So Wyld Man and I rushed there from church in order to meet Jim the seller before 12 noon, which was when they close shop.  While I was there, he took out some more books on sewing and pattern drafting. And I got them all. Sigh.

Aldrich’s book on Menswear

It’s the 1990 edition.

Overgarment block

Classic Shirt Block

Draft for a sports jacket

Drafting collars and revers

Drafts for boxer shorts and undies

Easy fitting classic suit block

I can’t wait to draft something for Wyld Man! He needs a new cassock for serving at mass.

This second book I picked up there was a real treasure.

Successful Dressmaking by Ellen and Marietta Resek

There is no date of publication, but it looks like it was written in the 40’s or early 50’s.

Although the book is titled “Successful Dressmaking”, it has a big section on just pattern drafting, which got me really excited.

It actually made a reference to Harriet Peppin, her book Modern Pattern Design being the definitive drafting book published in 1942. You can read the entire book at VintageSewing.info.

A reference to Harriet Peppin

A draft for a bodice block

I liked the simplicity of it. However, the armhole curve wasn’t detailed-it just said “Curve armhole”.

Sleeve draft

Skirt draft

Shorts draft

How to draft facings

Even a section on children’s wear

A list of contents

I paid AUD 20 for it. It was well worth it, because its more than 60 years old, in excellent condition for it’s age. The binding was tight, and the dust jacket in very good condition for a book that old. It was also published in Adelaide, which Wyld Man noted was unusual.

My next find-

Principles of Dressmaking by Doris Lewis

This book was published in Adelaide as well by the Education Department by the Government publisher in 1945.

It also has a big section on pattern drafting.

Publication information

How to take measurements

Basic Bodice

This book has actually made drafts of the basic bodice for different body shapes.

Drafts for the underdeveloped figure

Drafts for the stout figure.

Drafts for the extra stout figure

Brassier top slip

Smie fitting top coat

Double Breasted coat

Dressing Jacket

I paid AUD11 for this one.

All in all, it was a good day’s work.

Edited on 1/12/2014: I’ve published maternity and nursing patterns on Craftsy! Be sure to check them out!

Op Shop Bargains!

10 Feb

Last Saturday my mother-in-law stumbled into a Baptish Church opshop. Knowing my love for bargains, she went in and saw clothes, fabrics, baby things, and she hurried home to tell me about it. And both rushed back there a half hour before it closed. There were racks of clothes being sold at 50cents a piece, as well as rooms devoted to women’s wear, baby wear, menswear and odd bric-a-brac.

The first thing that caught my eye were 2 pairs of Jeanswest Maternity jeans-50 cents each!

Jeanswest Maternity Jeans

They were practically brand new and in my size!  I wouldn’t wear them in summer, but I’ll wear them in winter for a winter baby. Wink!

I was excited when I saw that they had a cupboardful of fabrics. Here’s what I picked out for a dollar a bundle.

My op shop fabric.

The top fabric is a large yardage of blue-green linen.

Pink polyester tricot.

A pretty light green checked cotton blend.

Would probably make a nice boy’s shirt.

A beautiful silver grey material.

Can’t figure out what it is. It’s wonderfully soft and silky, but I think it’s probably a synthetic blend.

A really pretty vintage print cotton

A mustard-brown linen.

And last but not least…

A really interesting heavy weight cotton print

I also browsed through they sewing notions and found this.

A shoebox full of zippers

And they weren’t old vintage ones either.

Some of the zippers were new.

The lady said there were some sewing books-but somebody had already made off with them. Darn!

But the prize of the day was this.

An almost brand new bassinet

It came in about 10 minutes after we did. And I just fell in love with it. Even though we already had one given to us…this on was just so hard to resist. It was absolutely beautiful. Retail it would be at least AUD150 or more. This one was AUD 25.  It was probably a spare one from the grandparents when they babysat the little one. But it really looks new. And the cream-coloured frills! To die for.

I also got this.

It's not a golf bag.

Take off the cover and you get this.

It's not a shopping trolley.

It unfolds to.....

A Portacot!

Really handy for travelling. Or even as a playpen! Got this one knocked down from AUD40 to AUD 20.

It was a wonderful day.